Matilda at The Cambridge Theatre

Cambridge Theatre

32-34 Earlham Street, London, WC2H 9HU
West End

The Cambridge Theatre opened in 1930, one of five theatres to open in London that year (including the nearby Prince Edward and Phoenix theatres). Designed by Wimperis, Simpson and Guthrie, the theatre occupies a triangular site on Seven Dials near Covent Garden and has interior designs by Serge Chermayeff and Anthony Gibbons Grinling, who sculpted the friezes still seen today. It is one of the most attractive interiors in the West End, having undergone restoration in 1987 after a series of internal changes.

A good sized house, the Cambridge Theatre suits musicals very well, though many plays have played the venue and it was opened with a production of Masquerade, a revue type show by André Charlot which starred Beatrice Lillie.

The original décor, ornate gold and silver finishes inspired by German theatres, was painted over in red in 1950 and the lighting was augmented with candelabras and chandeliers. These changes were implemented by new owners Tom Arnold and Prince Littler. Another conversion of the theatre in 1984 saw the house become London’s first theatre for magic called ‘The Magic Castle of Seven Dials’. The scheme was a disaster and closed after a year of performances. The theatre was then bought by Stoll Moss Theatres Ltd in 1986 and under the supervision of Carl Toms was restored to its original décor.

Listed as a Grade II building in 1999, the building became part of the Really Useful Group Ltd portfolio of theatres and has remained such since. Andrew Lloyd Webber premiered his latest musical here in 2000 (The Beautiful Game), and the house has gone from strength to strength with its productions of musicals ever since, with the controversial Jerry Springer – The Opera in 2003, the transfer of Chicago from the Adelphi Theatre in 2006 and the still running Matilda from November 2011.


The auditorium has three levels – Stalls, Royal Circle and Grand Circle.

The Stalls is not affected by the overhang from the Royal Circle, but the rake is rather shallow which may cause some issues with sightlines.

The Royal Circle is set rather far back, and with a shallow rake in the seats the audience seated here may feel detached from the action. The overhang of the Grand Circle is obvious from Row G onwards.

The Grand Circle is steeply raked which offers good sightlines but does feel far from the stage.


Recent Productions

Show Opened Closed Links
Matilda November 2011 - Review
Chicago April 2006

August 2011

(transferred to Garrick Theatre)

Dancing in the Streets July 2005 April 2006 Review
Derren Brown - Something Wicked This Way Comes June 2005 July 2005  
Jerry Springer - The Opera October 2003 February 2005 Review
Our House October 2002 August 2003 Review
Fame September 2001 August 2002  
The Beautiful Game September 2000 September 2001 Review
Great Balls of Fire October 1999 December 1999  
Grease October 1996 September 1999 Review


Travel Info
Nearest tube: 
Leicester Square
Tube lines: 
Piccadilly, Northern
Railway station: 
Charing Cross
Bus numbers: 
(Shaftesbury Avenue) 14, 19, 38; (Tottenham Court Road) 24, 29, 176
Night bus numbers: 
(Shaftesbury Avenue) 14, N5, N19, N20, N38; (Tottenham Court Road) 24, 176, N29, M41, N279
Car park: 
Chinatown (6mins)
Within congestion zone?: 
Directions from tube: 
(5mins) Take Cranbourn Street away from Leicester Square until St Martin’s Lane, where you head left 100 metres to a small roundabout where the theatre can be seen.
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