Three Days Of Rain Review 1999

  • Date:
    Wednesday, March 10, 1999
    Review by:
    Donna Birkwood

    The play takes place in modern day America with the reunion of a brother, sister and family friend at the reading of their father's will.  The discovery of their father's secret journal, which begins with an entry simply stating 'Three days of rain', is the first hint that there was more to the man than the three young adults remember from their childhood.  Following the reading of the will and its unexpected outcome, the son looks for explanations in the journal, twisting the words until they support his theories to explain his fathers actions.

    The second half of the play takes us back to the generation before, with the actors playing their respective parent at the time when the journal was actually written.  The secrets of the past are brought to life and the truth behind that mysterious first entry in the journal is explained.

    All three actors are very impressive, totally convincing when they cross the generation gap and come back to the play in the second half as different characters.  For fans of Colin Firth, do not expect to see Mr Darcy anywhere on the stage, in this play all the actors get the chance to prove they can play against type and do it well!


    "THREE DAYS OF RAIN" received reasonably good reviews from the popular press : NICHOLAS DE JONGH of THE EVENING STANDARD  says, "The force of Colin Firth's remarkable acting transcends the mere erotic appeal that on television made him the fantasy play-thing of so many women." THE DAILY EXPRESS says, "Unobtrusively directed by Robin Lefevre, it's a pleasure to see three actors inhabit an enjoyable new play with competence, calm and grace." THE DAILY MAIL says, "Three Days of Rain introduces a very clever, if rather dry and schematic young dramatist called Richard Greenberg. And we do him proud. Colin Firth, Elizabeth McGovern and David Morrissey add flesh and passion to two overlapping triangular love stories in New York. "However, BENEDICT NIGHTINGALE of THE TIMES  says, "I liked its wit and its sensitivity, but fear that it will pretty soon join a dozen other diaper dramas in my private oubliette."

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