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London Theatre Reviews

Planning a theatre trip and not sure whether to splurge on the star power and spectacle of a West End musical, experience an intimate drama in a Fringe venue, or check out the latest in new writing at the Royal Court?

See what our reviewers thought about all the latest London theatre offerings with our full theatre reviews listings! From classic dramas to new musicals, our editorial team have written about what they loved and what they didn’t. View our London Theatre Guide reviews below.

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  • Where is Peter Rabbit?

    Even though the tales of Beatrix Potter are over a century old, their continued ability to draw children into the imaginary world of Peter Rabbit and his friends still holds today. First performed at the Old Laundry Theatre at the World of Beatrix Potter in 2016, the stories leap from the glossy pages to London's theatre scene in a West End first at Where is Peter Rabbit?. Celebrating the author and her original characters during the 60-minute musical adaptation, it's a nostalgic show oozing...

  • Toast

    "It is impossible not to love someone who makes toast for you." So says Nigel Slater in his memoir, and indeed as the audience walks into The Other Palace, the smell of perfect on-the-brink-of-burned toast wafts through the foyer to envelop them in comfort and nostalgia.These are the enduring sentiments during this two-hour comic and sensory experience. Following a young boy's story through childhood, Toast hits many of the cultural touchpoints of 1960s Britain; Parma Violets and Bovril, The...

  • Top Girls

    Emilia may be making a splash in the West End right now for being a new play by a woman playwright with an all-female cast (and lead producers and creative team, too). But 37 years ago Caryl Churchill paved the way with Top Girls; and a play that was once of its time now proves to be a play for all time, as it is brought to the top table of the National Theatre for the first time.The play has been the source of many unfolding conversations and controversies in its time - it was originally...

  • Little Miss Sunshine

    Little Miss Sunshine is a fizzy - and admittedly occasionally fuzzy - little ray of musical sunshine. It is as eccentrically imperfect as the family it portrays who embark on a road trip from New Mexico to California in a wonky VW minibus van that's prone to breaking down so that the young daughter can enter a kids beauty contest. Yet, like them, its very fallibility is part of its generous wallop of charm; they are characters and a show that you want to root for. Especially one with...

  • Sh!t-faced Showtime

    In a time where the course of British politics is often unpredictable, watching a Golden Age musical adapted to star an alcohol-fuelled cast member where anything can happen felt like turning on the television to see parliamentary mayhem unfold. Shit-faced Showtime productions have been performed around the world for the last nine years, with the company's latest production featuring a rotating cast of seven performers take on Oliver Twist helped by a few shots of Dutch courage.The programme...

  • Fiddler on the Roof

    Review - Fiddler on the Roof at the Playhouse Theatre

    5/5
    Kit Kat Club at the Playhouse Theatre

    This is suddenly a golden age for the forever-classics of musical theatre, from London where Sondheim's Company and Follies have both had spellbinding reinventions, to Broadway where there are currently revelatory revivals of My Fair Lady, Oklahoma! and Kiss Me, Kate. And now, hot on the heels of an Off-Broadway revival of Fiddler on the Roof - performed, for the first time, in Yiddish, the language that would have actually been spoken in the Russian shtetl of Anatevka where it is set - comes...

  • Downstate

    Playwright Bruce Norris is following in David Mamet's blistering footsteps to become the current most urgent provocateur of American theatre. That he does so with more humanity and compassion, however, makes his work all the more stinging - less confrontational, yes, but also less black and white. His writing - whether on race in the brilliantly perceptive Clybourne Park, or now in Downstate, which revolves around a houseful of convicted paedophiles - altogether more shaded. The play begins with...

  • Emilia

    The Strand is suddenly thrillingly alive with women's stories. Hot on the heels of Dolly Parton's 9 to 5 the Musical, that brings a 1980s story of female office emancipation from a bullying male boss to the Savoy, came Waitress, arriving at the Adelphi Theatre from Broadway, which had as one of its selling points the fact that its lead creative team of writers, director and choreographer were all women. And now, right next door at the Vaudeville, there's Emilia - a new play by Morgan Lloyd...

  • Richard III

    John Haidar's Richard III is the inaugural show at the newly restored Alexandra Palace Theatre, its boards for the treading once more after an 80-year hiatus. This is a worthy setting. It has the feel of a Roman coliseum or a Medieval church with its great walls baring naked brick and plasterwork. The cavernous theatre seems to exude history, despite its recent makeover, which magnifies the pathos of this deliciously dark production.The longest of Shakespeare's history plays, Richard III is a...

  • Tom Hiddleston and Zawe Ashton in Betrayal

    Director Jamie Lloyd has just finished a six-month season featuring seven rotating bills of all Harold Pinter's short plays, which proved to be a thrilling and frequently alarming journey into some of the playwright's lesser-known works. Now, Lloyd follows it with a blisteringly brilliant production of one of Pinter's best-known (but still brief) and most powerful and personal plays, Betrayal, originally premiered at the National in 1978.I missed that first production as I was only 15 at the...

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