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London Theatre Reviews

Planning a theatre trip and not sure whether to splurge on the star power and spectacle of a West End musical, experience an intimate drama in a Fringe venue, or check out the latest in new writing at the Royal Court?

See what our reviewers thought about all the latest London theatre offerings with our full theatre reviews listings! From classic dramas to new musicals, our editorial team have written about what they loved and what they didn’t. View our London Theatre Guide reviews below.

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  • Conceived by Robert Lepage, the play is in 7 acts covering the period from the bombing of Hiroshima in 1945 to the present day. Lepage used video and images to great effect mixed in with opera singing and some very bizarre scenes.The first four acts are simply superb and gripping . However it's down hill from then on. There were still some great theatre to be had but the last few acts were getting a little off subject and a little harder to understand. I thought all the acts would be connected...

  • Hampstead Theatre is fast becoming the go-to London address for new American plays originated amongst the vibrant Broadway and off-Broadway producing companies to receive their U.K premieres at. Two years ago they scored a hit (and a subsequent West End transfer) with David Lindsay-Abaire's Good People, a penetrating portrait about being reminded of your roots and past when you've seemingly left them behind, and now the theatre has produced Lindsay-Abaire's earlier play Rabbit Hole, which...

  • Round The Horne was a popular BBC radio comedy sketch show which regularly pulled in huge weekly audiences of 15 million listeners. It ran for four series from 1965 until 1968 and consisted of a regular line-up of performers, including Carry On star Kenneth Williams. The show has now been brought back to life by Producer/Director Tim Astley, Artistic Director of the Apollo Theatre Company, recreating some of its best sketches by using material from the original radio broadcasts. For some, this...

  • It's been fifteen years almost to the week that I first saw Disney's The Lion King in what was its first year in the West End. I don't think even Disney could have predicted that sixteen years later the show would still be London's most popular musical, selling out performances eight times a week and playing to packed crowds.Judging the show against the current climate of the West End, I worried some of the magic may have faded, but Julie Taymor's staging and costume design remains some of the...

  • The Donmar musical - like those at the Menier Chocolate Factory — used to be a regular fixture, both under Sam Mendes and then Michael Grandage. Now Josie Rourke at last seizes the initiative and makes her own musical theatre directing debut at the theatre she now runs, and scores a bulls-eye winner with her first foray into the genre.It helps that she's chosen a winner to begin with: to be precise, a Tony and Laurence Olivier Award winner for Best Musical for its original Broadway and West End...

  • Never saw the 1954 film: Bing Crosby was a bit passé even for my generation. But the song is inescapable, and in certain moods, dammit, can still stir the heart. The musical been done for a UK tour but astonishingly this is its first big West End outing.And a few times, especially in the first half, I could see why. Not to put too fine a point on it, its gentle aw-shucks goodwill and its ambling, I-feel-a-song-coming-on structure at times makes Top Hat o look as cutting-edge as Cabaret. But...

  • The anticipation of a new production of 'The Tempest' usually initiates in me a feeling of impending frustration. Why? Because the traditional view of this last of Shakespeare's triumphs is that it is a play about revenge. And a glance at the synopsis for this new version at the Globe Theatre, shows this idea has still not been eradicated. But even a brief skim-through of the first few pages of the text tells you that the main character in the play, Prospero, is only concerned about his...

  • Here's another chance to see this all-male version of Shakespeare's 'Twelfe Night' which previously had a run at the Globe over the past summer. It features Mark Rylance as Olivia and Stephen Fry as Malvolio, and is running alongside another of last summer's successes at the Globe, Richard III, again with Mark Rylance in the lead.Entering the auditorium, you might be forgiven for thinking that the Globe had been squashed and miraculously trundled indoors for the winter. Two small galleries made...

  • Based on a 1970 play by Christopher Bond, this retelling of the story of the 'Demon Barber of Fleet Street' first appeared in 1979 and boasts a book by Hugh Wheeler and music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim. Coming from the prolific Chichester Festival Theatre, this is one of those productions that really is stunning both in its execution and in terms of the story and music, making it one of the must-see musicals of, perhaps, the decade.The story of Sweeney Todd emanates from the England of the...

  • Four successful films are sufficient credentials to warrant a stage appearance for the swamp-dwelling ogre, Shrek. And it has duly arrived with Nigel Lindsay as Shrek and Richard Blackwood as his side-kick, Donkey. As you might expect, the colour theme of the show is ... green! For the uninitiated, Shrek's skin is green, hence the choice of colour, or at least I presume that is the rationalisation for it. At the beginning, we're given a glimpse into Shrek's past in a scene where his parents push...

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