The oldest and first dedicated online London theatre guide News and tickets for over 250 West End & off-West End showsFollow us for the latest theatre news Twitter

LT New LOGO

London Theatre Reviews

Planning a theatre trip and not sure whether to splurge on the star power and spectacle of a West End musical, experience an intimate drama in a Fringe venue, or check out the latest in new writing at the Royal Court?

See what our reviewers thought about all the latest London theatre offerings with our full theatre reviews listings! From classic dramas to new musicals, our editorial team have written about what they loved and what they didn’t. View our London Theatre Guide reviews below.

Sort byMost recent
  • Photo credit: Arinzé Kene (Photo by Craig Sugden)

    How to demystify the icon that is Bob Marley, to separate the man from the mantles placed upon him: reggae superstar, Black hero, poetic advocate of peace and love, ganja-smoking Rasta inspiration, or cool dude splashed across T-shirts and posters in student halls? It's a struggle that this intermittently powerful new show both tackles head on and embodies in its own flawed form.Lee Hall's book is at its weakest when it follows the jukebox bio-musical model, racing breathlessly through Marley's...

  • Photo credit: Tom Mothersdale and Abigail Weinstock (Photo by Helen Murray)

    Emotions come fast, sometimes funny and more often downright furious in Cordelia Lynn's Love and Other Acts of Violence, which is two-thirds of a major play before going off the rails in a final sequence - an Epilogue which is arresting to look at but thematically hamfisted, even superfluous. The first so-called "proper" play to open at the Donmar Warehouse in 18 months (their much-acclaimed Blindness was a sound installation), this nervy and unnerving one-act is terrifically acted by its cast...

  • Photo credit: Saoirse Ronan and James McArdle (Photo by Marc Brenner)Photo credit: Saoirse Ronan and James McArdle (Photo by Marc Brenner)

    Before the Wyrd sisters utter a word, we know something sinister is afoot. A dark stage features a wheelchair, an oxygen tank, a water spigot, and a wheelbarrow of black boots with a ghostlight illuminating the scene. As the still-life awakens, we're greeted with a tableau of a war-torn country, complete with soldiers and the title Scot picking up his rifle. Something wicked this way comes indeed. Director Yaël Farber's pulsating and achingly current take on Shakespeare's tragedy makes the...

  • Photo credit: The Beauty Queen of Leenane (Photo by Helen Maybanks)

    Hearing the line "in England, they don't care if you live or die" in The Beauty Queen of Leenane sent my mind whirring. As societies emerge from their chrysalis into Covid's world, receiving less government help has now become a reality for millions of families. Many across the country are now faced with looking after elderly relatives, as well as their own families, while still looking for work and a way to return to a sense of "normalcy."And even though The Beauty Queen of Leenane is set in...

  • Photo credit: Sophie Stanton and Tony Jayawardena in East is East (Photo by Pamela Raith Photography)

    How time flies: I remember being at once entranced and moved by East Is East, when Ayub Khan Din's debut play first appeared in 1996 in a 60-seat central London studio space before moving on to two larger London venues and then Leslee Udwin's highly engaging 1999 film. Since then, the same material has never quite landed in the same way, at least for me: a 2014 revival, starring Khan Din himself as the paternal scold at the play's bruising centre, misfired, and so, to a lesser degree, does Iqbal...

  • Photo credit: Ben Miles in The Mirror and the Light (Photo by Marc Brenner)

    In Hilary Mantel's 2020 novel The Mirror and The Light, the conclusion of her epic trilogy fictionalising the rise and fall of Tudor courtier Thomas Cromwell, the final stages of the story draw together what has up to that point been a sprawling and sometimes disjointed-feeling narrative into a whole that coheres only in hindsight — ours, and Cromwell's. Now that it's all done, we can see the missed opportunities, overlooked hints, the signs the wind was changing. The 2021 stage adaptation of...

  • Photo credit: Metamorphoses (Photo by Helen Murray)

    The quartet of actors appear dressed in white for most of the 90 minutes of Metamorphoses, which reopens the Globe's indoor Sam Wanamaker space for the first time since March 2020 and very entertainingly, too. But playgoers would be better advised to take their cue from a red stage floor hinting at the carnage and bloodshed that soon come interspersed amid the deceptive good cheer. Yes, there's an unexpected audience singalong to, of all songs, "American Pie," but the show is more aptly defined...

  • Photo credit: Cush Jumbo (Photo by Helen Murray)

    Like many shows, this Hamlet was long delayed by the pandemic. But Cush Jumbo, now a US TV star thanks to The Good Wife and The Good Fight, gives such a commanding lead performance - crystal clear in intention and riveting delivery - that it absolutely feels worth the wait. Which makes it all the more frustrating that the production surrounding her is so vague and meandering, occasionally enlivened by some good supporting turns, but lacking an overall vision. It plods along while Jumbo itches to...

  • Photo credit: Linda Bassett, Samir Simon-Keegan and John Heffernan (Photo by Johan Persson)

    In between two mammoth outings (The Normal Heart at two hours 45, Hamlet at three hours 15), I caught Caryl Churchill's new play What If If Only, which is roughly the length of the interval of those epics. In fact, it was due to be even shorter - it's gone up to 20 minutes from the originally announced 14 - but the indomitable Churchill proves that small can be mighty, particularly when your work is so innately, and potently, theatrical.The opening stage direction is simply "Someone on their...

  • Photo credit: Roger Bart and Olly Dobson (Photo by Sean Ebsworth Barnes)

    ​​Great Scott! Roger Bart, whose positive Covid test kept him from opening night earlier this month, is once again bringing his 1.21 gigawatts of zany energy to Doc Brown. I went back to Back to the Future to see Bart in action (after catching his understudy Mark Oxtoby), and, in both versions of the time-space-actor continuum, enjoyed a show that is, indisputably, a fantastic night out.This West End musical incarnation of the 1985 movie is over a decade in the making, following lengthy...

This website uses cookies.