The oldest and first dedicated online London theatre guide News and tickets for over 250 West End & off-West End showsFollow us for the latest theatre news Twitter

LT New LOGO

London Theatre Reviews

Planning a theatre trip and not sure whether to splurge on the star power and spectacle of a West End musical, experience an intimate drama in a Fringe venue, or check out the latest in new writing at the Royal Court?

See what our reviewers thought about all the latest London theatre offerings with our full theatre reviews listings! From classic dramas to new musicals, our editorial team have written about what they loved and what they didn’t. View our London Theatre Guide reviews below.

Sort byMost recent
  • Photo credit: Jersey Boys (Photo by Piers Allardyce)

    The gorgeously revamped Trafalgar Theatre (formerly Trafalgar Studios) christens its new auditorium with an old favourite: 2005 biographical jukebox musical Jersey Boys, which last ran in the West End from 2008-2017. Well, the boys are back in town - a strong lure for those audiences still working their way back to theatre.Marshall Brickman and Rick Elice's show makes a virtue out of the Four Seasons members' conflicting recollections of their rise to fame and subsequent acrimonious split. The...

  • Anna Maxwell Martin and Chris O'Dowd in Constellations (Photo by Marc Brenner)

    The inspiring multiple-cast run of Nick Payne's multiverse play Constellations continues to wow in the West End. Us lucky critics have already seen two pairs - Sheila Atim and Ivanno Jeremiah, and Zoë Wanamaker and Peter Capaldi (reviewed here) - as cosmologist Marianne and beekeeper Roland. In Payne's skilful dramatisation of the infinite variations in parallel universes, the couple variously get together or don't, break up for different reasons, get married or don't, and face a major health...

  • Twelfth Night at Shakespeare's Globe (Photo by Marc Brenner)

    Welcome to Illyria, where it's Mardi Gras every day, and the now-ramshackle town has been overrun by the Countess's vagabonds and fools. Imagine being ship-wrecked in this sin-laden land, where debauchery and jokesters seem to rule in the inconsistent-yet-jubilant production of Twelfth Night at Shakespeare's Globe. Twelfth Night is one of Shakespeare's most popular comedies, and for those who don't remember the tale from school, the story starts with a shipwreck that separates twins Viola and...

  • Photo credit: Julia Chan, Lily Allen, Hadley Fraser and Jake Wood in 2:22 A Ghost Story (Photo by Helen Murray)

    Lily Allen shrieks before she even says a word in 2:22: A Ghost Story, which tips you off immediately as to the way Danny Robins's debut West End play is due to proceed. But the name-grabbing debut on view is, of course, singer-songwriter Allen, who was due some years back to be penning a major musical of Bridget Jones's Diary from which she parted company along the way.Instead, here Allen is, looking sleek and glam and very much forming part of the four-person ensemble that has been assembled...

  • Photo credit: Lesley Sharp, Amie Francis and Sutara Gayle in Paradise (Photo by Helen Murray)

    This summer's barrage of theatre openings comes to an unexpectedly heady climax with Paradise, the poet and polymath Kae Tempest's brave and bruising modern-day adaptation of Sophocles's Philoctetes. Marking the first show in 18 months or so to open at the National Theatre to full capacity, Ian Rickson's production reminds us of this director's singular gift for theatrical transliteration and, indeed, translation, as reflected in his magnificent revival at this same address a few years ago of...

  • Carousel at Regent's Park Open Air Theatre (Photo by Johan Persson)

    "When you walk through a storm Hold your head up high And don't be afraid of the dark"Those powerful lyrics from the Rodgers and Hammerstein classic "You'll Never Walk Alone" hit a little differently after over a year of a pandemic, a "storm" that has shuttered our theatres, separated our families, and devastated our world. There was also a literal storm brewing on Monday night at the Regent's Park Open Air Theatre, and the company of Carousel definitely walked on through the wind, rain, and...

  • Photo credit: Ciarán Owens (Wills), Kara Tointon (Kate), Crystal Condie (Meghan), Tom Durant-Pritchard (Harry) (Photo by Marc Brenner)

    Writing anything about the Royal Family can get you cancelled these days. Well, it's time to stick my neck out on the line and say "God Save the King," as the Prince of Wales ascends to the throne — aptly at the Prince of Wales Theatre — in The Windsors: Endgame. Perhaps like the Royal Family themselves, The Windsors: Endgame will divide opinion like marmite. Some will dislike the show's bitter taste, but this is a masterclass in British satire. The Windsors: Endgame is a right royal pantomime...

  • Photo credit: Singin' in the Rain (Photo by Manuel Harlan)

    ​​Trust the British weather to make the opening of Singin' in the Rain an immersive experience, with a flurry of umbrellas outside the theatre to match those onstage. And while the revival of Jonathan Church's 2011 Chichester production was certainly cheering on a drizzly night, faithfully re-creating the beloved movie, it never really wowed.Partly, it had the misfortune of following the explosive Anything Goes, which set an enormously high bar for Golden Age musicals. But while that production...

  • Photo credit: Big Big Sky (Photo by Robert Day)

    Big Big Sky is the ample name given the lovingly conceived new Hampstead Downstairs play by Tom Wells that somewhat overreaches for an effect that Tessa Walker's production doesn't entirely achieve. Telling of the shifting fortunes of four denizens in a cafe in Kilnsea, East Yorkshire - familiar terrain for this writer - the play catches human behaviour on the wing without quite transporting the playgoer to the state of theatrical grace that would seem to be the goal.Dispensing vegan brownies...

  • Photo credit: Anything Goes (Photo by Tristram Kenton)

    Are there any actors you wish you could travel back in time and see onstage? For me, it's stars like Carol Channing in Hello,Dolly!, Ethel Merman in Annie Get Your Gun, or Julie Andrews in My Fair Lady. Imagine what it would be like to experience those legends creating those iconic roles. There are also performances I've seen but would love to be able to revisit, like Patti LuPone in Gypsy, Cynthia Erivo in The Color Purple, or Audra McDonald in anything. While theatre's ephemeral nature is part...

This website uses cookies.