London Theatre Reviews

Read the latest London theatre reviews on the newest openings across the West End and beyond. Discover more about the latest must-see West End shows, Off-West End productions, and why you need to see shows in London. Scroll through our full theatre reviews listings of London musicals, plays, and live events from our London Theatre critics.

Sort byMost recent
  • Sh!t-faced Showtime

    In a time where the course of British politics is often unpredictable, watching a Golden Age musical adapted to star an alcohol-fuelled cast member where anything can happen felt like turning on the television to see parliamentary mayhem unfold. Shit-faced Showtime productions have been performed around the world for the last nine years, with the company's latest production featuring a rotating cast of seven performers take on Oliver Twist helped by a few shots of Dutch courage.The programme...

  • Fiddler on the Roof

    This is suddenly a golden age for the forever-classics of musical theatre, from London where Sondheim's Company and Follies have both had spellbinding reinventions, to Broadway where there are currently revelatory revivals of My Fair Lady, Oklahoma! and Kiss Me, Kate. And now, hot on the heels of an Off-Broadway revival of Fiddler on the Roof - performed, for the first time, in Yiddish, the language that would have actually been spoken in the Russian shtetl of Anatevka where it is set - comes...

  • Emilia

    The Strand is suddenly thrillingly alive with women's stories. Hot on the heels of Dolly Parton's 9 to 5 the Musical, that brings a 1980s story of female office emancipation from a bullying male boss to the Savoy, came Waitress, arriving at the Adelphi Theatre from Broadway, which had as one of its selling points the fact that its lead creative team of writers, director and choreographer were all women. And now, right next door at the Vaudeville, there's Emilia - a new play by Morgan Lloyd...

    Vaudeville Theatre
  • Downstate

    Playwright Bruce Norris is following in David Mamet's blistering footsteps to become the current most urgent provocateur of American theatre. That he does so with more humanity and compassion, however, makes his work all the more stinging - less confrontational, yes, but also less black and white. His writing - whether on race in the brilliantly perceptive Clybourne Park, or now in Downstate, which revolves around a houseful of convicted paedophiles - altogether more shaded. The play begins with...

  • Richard III

    John Haidar's Richard III is the inaugural show at the newly restored Alexandra Palace Theatre, its boards for the treading once more after an 80-year hiatus. This is a worthy setting. It has the feel of a Roman coliseum or a Medieval church with its great walls baring naked brick and plasterwork. The cavernous theatre seems to exude history, despite its recent makeover, which magnifies the pathos of this deliciously dark production.The longest of Shakespeare's history plays, Richard III is a...

    Alexandra Palace
  • Tom Hiddleston and Zawe Ashton in Betrayal

    Director Jamie Lloyd has just finished a six-month season featuring seven rotating bills of all Harold Pinter's short plays, which proved to be a thrilling and frequently alarming journey into some of the playwright's lesser-known works. Now, Lloyd follows it with a blisteringly brilliant production of one of Pinter's best-known (but still brief) and most powerful and personal plays, Betrayal, originally premiered at the National in 1978.I missed that first production as I was only 15 at the...

    Harold Pinter Theatre
  • Admissions

    The era of Trump and Trumpism has ignited a flurry of culture wars that were already simmering. Is affirmative action to increase the representation of black and minority students in college admissions in America the right way to go? And what happens to the previously-privileged status of white students who may lose out as a result?Last July, the Trump administration withdrew Obama-era policy guidelines that encouraged the consideration of race in college admissions; but playwright Joshua Harmon...

    Trafalgar Studios
  • The Twilight Zone

    The West End is already full of stage versions of films, with Waitress and 9 to 5 newly added to the musicals roster and All About Eve to the one for plays. Now the back TV catalogue is being plundered too, with Only Fools and Horses recently turned into a musical and now a transfer for the Almeida's 2017 stage version of The Twilight Zone. The original series aired between 1959 and 1964, with subsequent revivals following in the mid-eighties and then early noughties, with yet another series now...

    Ambassadors Theatre
  • Waitress

    Waitress opened on Broadway in the same 2015/16 season as Hamilton - so, hardly surprisingly, lost out in the Tony Awards race, including for best musical and best original score. Yet, nearly three years on from its premiere there, it is still running - a block away from Hamilton (and the only shows from that season still be doing so). It has obviously struck a chord with theatregoers - and now it has come to London (with an international roll-out still to follow in Australia and Japan). It is...

    Adelphi Theatre
  • Alys, Always

    Another day, another middling (and very middle-class) new play at the Bridge. Great things were expected for this theatre, founded by Nick Hytner and Nick Starr after they departed from the National Theatre, which they had turned into the single most exciting theatrical address in London. But at the opening night of Alys, Always, I ran into a prominent younger British playwright who told me he was making his first visit to the venue - and I replied, "You've not missed much." (There was one...

    Bridge Theatre

Subscribe to our newsletter to unlock exclusive London theatre updates!

Special offers, reviews and release dates for the best shows in town.

You can unsubscribe at any time. Privacy Policy