London Theatre Reviews

Read the latest London theatre reviews on the newest openings across the West End and beyond. Discover more about the latest must-see West End shows, Off-West End productions, and why you need to see shows in London. Scroll through our full theatre reviews listings of London musicals, plays, and live events from our London Theatre critics.

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  • Back in the day I've seen male strippers, of various stripes, at Leicester Square's London Hippodrome: in the 80s, when Stringfellow ran it as a nightclub, there was a gay night where, one night, I saw the late gay porn star Leo Ford make an appearance; while this century, the venue hosted a London season for La Soiree, the subversive burlesque show that featured artful stripping (from all genders). But with its conversion to a glamorous 24-hour casino, planning permission required this former...

  • Romeo and Juliet

    The RSC's annual residency at their former full-time London home the Barbican has so far seen two of three productions from the main house at Stratford-upon-Avon transfer to London. Reviewing Macbeth, my colleague Will Longman called it a "tepid, sometimes dizzying production"; RSC deputy artistic director Erica Whyman's version of Romeo and Juliet now is somewhat warmer and conspicuously more lively and deliberately youthful, but it is also over-strenuous in its attempts to contemporise the...

  • Don Quixote

    The RSC is back, at least part-time, at the Barbican Centre, reversing its former boss Adrian Noble's ridiculous decision to remove the company from their purpose-built London home there back in 2001, but they now have a muddled identity in the capital. The dull old Shakespeare's seem to go to the City of London (they are currently in the midst of a three play season there), where they struggle to compete with the far livelier classical offerings at other London theatres from the National to the...

    Garrick Theatre
  • Rosalie Craig

    Company, first premiered on Broadway in 1970, was always a bold, brilliant musical: a series of brief vignettes (by George Furth) and dazzling songs (by Stephen Sondheim) about the challenges of dating and marriage and the fears of being trapped. The songs and scenes flow in and out of each other in an impressionistic haze as a man, about to celebrate his 35th birthday, confronts his deep-rooted fears about long-term relationships and the loneliness of being on his own.But in the show's third...

    Gielgud Theatre
  • The Inheritance

    During one of the intervals for The Inheritance, newly transferred from the Young Vic where it premiered in March to the West End's Noel Coward Theatre, I ran into Martin Sherman, who wrote one of the great gay plays of my lifetime in Bent, a shattering account of gay life (and death) in a Nazi concentration camp. I was a 17-year-old gay man just coming to terms with my sexuality when this forever-potent play first premiered in 1979 at the Royal Court and it exposed me to a heart-breaking legacy...

    Young Vic (Main House)
  • Heathers the Musical

    Given its colourful design and glittery pop soundtrack, you'd be forgiven for thinking Heathers is a light-hearted coming-of-age, high school comedy, but it's bloody dark: murder and suicide, bulimia and bullying dominate the Westerberg campus. Based on the '80s Winona Ryder film, this musical offering has earned a cult following over the years on the back of its zany humour and infectious soundtrack, and it now lands in the West End starring musical theatre stalwart Carrie Hope...

    The Other Palace - Main Theatre
  • Home, I'm Darling

    Prim, polished and proper: that's what the 50s were all about, right? The husband made the money, and the wife stayed at home, cooked, cleaned and made sure the house was in order. That's the world Laura Wade has created in her new play, Home, I'm Darling, a modern dissection of second- and fourth-wave feminism. That is until housewife Judy opens a drawer in the breakfast table and pulls out her Macbook.Despite what Anna Fleischle's stunningly authentic set and costumes have you believe, we're...

  • Following the unprecedented critical successes of Walt Disney’s first animated classics Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs and Pinocchio, many regarded his next venture – a collection of largely unrelated animated segments accompanying classical music – as a huge risk. Of course, we’re talking about Walt’s 1940 masterpiece Fantasia, the first commercial film to be presented in stereophonic sound. In a similar, yet admittedly smaller fashion, Sounds and Sorcery celebrating Disney Fantasia could also...

    The Vaults Theatre
  • As You Like It

    In her first production as artistic director of Shakespeare's Globe, Michelle Terry brings the theatre back to basics with the introduction of an ensemble cast of 12 who will perform several plays throughout this summer season. The jovial As You Like It is the curtain raiser, and it sets the bar at a very decent level. The ensemble have been in rehearsals for 12 weeks, and although there are two designated directors - Federay Holmes and Elle White - the cast have been given a lot much freedom in...

  • The Phantom of the Opera

    Stop a person on the street and ask them to name a West End musical, they'll probably say one of two things: Les Mis, or The Phantom of the Opera. The latter has been impressively running non-stop at Her Majesty's Theatre for over 3 decades now, but does Andrew Lloyd Webber's musical still have the same sense of wonder as it did all that time ago. There's no question that it's a complete classic: the story tells of the titular phantom who haunts an opera house, the tales of his presence in the...

    His Majesty’s Theatre

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