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London Theatre Reviews

Planning a theatre trip and not sure whether to splurge on the star power and spectacle of a West End musical, experience an intimate drama in a Fringe venue, or check out the latest in new writing at the Royal Court?

See what our reviewers thought about all the latest London theatre offerings with our full theatre reviews listings! From classic dramas to new musicals, our editorial team have written about what they loved and what they didn’t. View our London Theatre Guide reviews below.

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  • Photo credit: Luke Thallon and Patsy Ferran (Photo by Manuel Harlan)

    Who knew there was a Nazi summer camp on New York's Long Island in the 1930s? While renting a house there during the pandemic, American playwright Bess Wohl began reading about Camp Siegfried in the town of Yaphank, where kids marched down Hitler Street and flower beds were planted like swastikas. In fact, it was one of several such camps in the U.S., fascism and hatred gathering force in plain sight.What a compelling premise for drama, and Wohl takes the astute decision to make this an intimate...

  • Photo credit: Is God Is (Photo by Tristram Kenton)

    God is a woman in Is God Is, the electrifying Aleshea Harris play that makes every bit as strong an impression on the Royal Court mainstage as it did off-Broadway at Soho Rep in 2018. (The explosive 90-minute work has also been optioned as a film.) Arriving as part of an exciting sequence of American female writers debuting works in London (Suzan-Lori Parks's White Noise and Bess Wohl's Camp Siegfried are both to come, while Paula Vogel's Indecent only just opened), Is God Is weds the sort of...

  • Photo credit: NW Trilogy (Photo by Marc Brenner)

    NW Trilogy centres on the people who once resided right on the doorstep of Kilburn's Kiln Theatre where the piece makes its debut. It's a beautifully realised collection of plays where audiences are taken on a vivid tour through the vibrant history of north west London during the 1960s and 1970s. As part of a commission from the Brent Borough of Culture, the plays showcase the lived experiences of the immigrant communities at the time and how they wrestled with adversity. Dance Floor is the...

  • Photo credit: Indecent Cast (Photo by Johan Persson)

    Talk about a delayed thrill: Paula Vogel's lauded play Indecent was primed for its British debut at the Menier Chocolate Factory back in March 2020, when the curtains came down across theatreland. So here it finally is, directed as in New York by Tony winner Rebecca Taichman but even more immediately powerful and moving than I remember from its Vineyard Theatre iteration. (The subsequent Broadway transfer won an additional Tony for Christopher Akerlind's lighting, which is no less virtuosic...

  • Photo credit: Samantha Barks and Stephanie McKeon in Frozen (Photo by Johan Persson)

    Elsa must feel at home in London, where the weather can turn faster than you can say "let it go." After a blustery and blue summer (Elsa, is that you?), the sun emerged for the first 30-degree day in months on the press night for Frozen, a winning sign for a bright new Disney musical in the West End. The legendary ice queen likely feels at home in the completely redone Theatre Royal Drury Lane, which feels positively palatial with vaulted ceilings, detailed frescos, and golden accents. All it...

  • Photo credit: The Memory of Water (Photo by Helen Murray)

    Time hasn't been kind to The Memory of Water, Shelagh Stephenson's play about three sisters brought together following the death of their mother. I saw Terry Johnson's premiere of this same play at the Hampstead Theatre in 1996, and it's fascinating to note the darker hues that it has acquired under Alice Hamilton's direction. But one could equally argue that so hard-edged an approach only serves to amplify the inconsistencies in the writing, not to mention a wearying quality to the narrative...

  • Photo credit: Rockets and Blue Lights (Photo by Brinkhoff/Mogenburg)

    Two women look at a painting by J. M. W. Turner: The Slave Ship. We can see the painting only through their descriptions: the blood-red sky, the churning waves, the faceless bodies half-submerged in the sea. It is, as playwright Winsome Pinnock has characters meditate at several points in the play, a scene that is all world and no people: the ship, the sky, the ocean. The enslaved people being thrown to their deaths over the side of the ship are deliberately obscured. Pinnock's new play Rockets...

  • Adrian Edmondson and Ethan Kai in Once Upon a Time in Nazi Occupied Tunisia at the Almeida.(Photo by Marc Brenner)

    In a time long ago, well 1943 to be exact, Tunisia was home to Arabs and Jews who lived together under French rule. The Nazi's invasion of Tunisia introduced violence, suffering, and betrayal between neighbours. Such is the setting for the Almeida's new drama about war, survival, and identity which playwright Josh Azouz serves drenched in sickly black humour.In the play's striking opening scene, designer Max Johns has innovatively recreated a Tunisian desert using sand coloured boxes of various...

  • Photo credit: Operation Mincemeat (Photo by Matt Crockett)

    From its opening chorus, Operation Mincemeat is a fizzy, clever, compelling new musical. Though billed as a work-in-progress, don't come in expecting a half-finished evening: this is a tight and carefully considered piece that deserves to be seen on a much larger stage soon. Composition and writing team SplitLip (consisting of David Cumming, Felix Hagan, Natasha Hodgson, and Zoe Roberts, who also make up four of the five members of the acting company) have been publicly workshopping the show...

  • Carrie Hope Fletcher, Laura Baldwin, Victora Hamilton-Barritt, Georgina Castle in Cinderella, Photo Credit Tristram Kenton

    We could all use a fairytale right now after the year (and a half) we've had. A little escapism to drown our troubles and remember that sometimes happy endings and dreams do come true. Well, Andrew Lloyd Webber's Cinderella is a different kind of fairytale, one that, instead, reminds us of our humanity and that sometimes things turn out as you least expect them to. Who wants to ride off into the sunset anyway when you could make mistakes and learn some things along the way?That's certainly been...

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